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Coffees > Regional


 Our approach to roasting and selling coffee is simple. Buy the very best coffee available and roast it carefully in order to bring out the full deep rich flavor locked with the coffee bean. The sign on the wall says: "If its not the best don’t buy, don’t roast it, don’t sell it and certainly don’t drink it." 

The Americas
Guatemalan Antigua

Finca El Portal has been producing coffee for over 120 years. Currently the farm is managed by  Coralia Herrera and Mario Calderon Herrera, who are 3rd and 4th generation coffee producers, respectively.  All the coffee is processed at the farm’s mill where it goes through a meticulous traditional wash before being sundried to 10-12% moisture on the patios. Once in dry parchment the coffee is broken into 25 bag lots for storage. After each lot reaches the necessary rest (around 6 weeks), they are offered to InterAmerican Coffee for selection.

Cupping Notes

Dry: floral, chocolate, fruits. Crust: chocolate, fruits. Break: berries, chocolate. Hints of jasmine, slight dry in aftertaste, clean, winy acidity, fruit-chocolate flavors throughout.

Brazil Cerrado Natural 2 Scr.17/18
Mild taste, low acidity, medium body.

Brazil is a well known coffee producing giant. They source around one-third of the world's coffee, making them the largest coffee producer in the globe! Of course, most of this is lower grade Arabica. However, this country is capable of producing specialty coffees.

This particular type is a standard specialty quality coffee. Itt is dry-processed, meaning the beans are patio-dried while they are still in the cherry. Since the coffees are dried in contact with the sweet mucilage, the coffee's cup profile will be heavy in body, sweet, smooth, and complex. The 17/18 screen size has a more consistent flavor without the pungent fruit notes that can turn up in smaller screen sized beans, which is an indication of varying bean maturity.

This type carries three quality classifications:

  • NY (New York) 2/3;  specifies the quality is standard to the Green Coffee Association of New York. 2/3 refers to the amount of defects permitted in the lot; a maximum of nine secondary defects, and no primary defects.
  • SSFC (Strictly Soft Fine Cup); Strictly Soft beans are grown at relatively low altitudes (under 1200 meters). Beans grown at lower altitudes mature quickly and produce a lighter, less dense bean. This term also means the beans are free of hard rioy taints. Fine Cup means it is a specialty grade coffee.
  • 17/18 refers to the screen size. These beans are one screen size larger than 14/16, denoting a larger bean. Larger bean size is generally linked to higher quality.

Cupping Notes

chocolate notes, medium body, nutty, sweet, caramel, clean finish


Colombia , RFA Supremo 17/18 Huila
Good acidity and body, rich balanced flavor.

Colombia RFA Huila comes from a group of small Rain Forest Alliance certified farms with an average size of 2 hectares each, located within the Huila department. Several purchasing agencies around the area meticulously control each purchase to guarantee traceability and quality. These small farms are planted in mostly Caturra, and processing is of the traditional method. They all use manual hand-crank depulping machines to remove the cherry from the beans. They use raised beds for drying the coffee which gives the coffee good air circulation and even drying. In short these folks oversee the transformation of their coffee cherry to dried parchment, which is a real benefit, allowing the farmer to oversee how their coffee is handled, sorted, and prepped every step of the way. Their efforts have been rewarded with a Rainforest Alliance Certification, one of the most demanding sustainability seals. The positive impact to the preservation of this regions’ biodiversity is substantial. They work closely with neighboring plantations to raise the awareness of the importance of organic and rainforest certifications, because they are influential for both the land and the workers.

Cupping Notes

This cup has well balanced acidity with a delicate body. It starts off sweet and with slight notes of tart fruit, and finishes with a bittersweet, dark cocoa note.


Costa Rica Terrazu Don Roberto - Estate
Mild, balanced, full-bodied richness.

Beginning in 1928, Manuel Rojas and his sister Romelia had visions of growing coffee in the Tarrazú region. They became one of the first families to plant coffee in this famous region. Soon after seeing the quality of the coffee produced and its distinct acidity and aroma, the majority of peasants and farmers changed crops from sugar to coffee.

The pure air and crystal clear waters of Tarrazú are what made Roberto Montero Castro fall in love with the slopes of San Marcos de Tarrazú. Given that the Rojas family had no immediate descendants, they sold their farm and mill to this visionary. Completely dedicated to this passion, Montero actually offered assistance in farming techniques and consultative services to the peasant farmers of Tarrazú.

Blessed with just the right amount of tropical acidity, the soil of Tarrazú produces a coffee of tremendously unique quality. On these soils Don Roberto Tarrazú was born, grown at no less than 4200 feet with brilliant acidity, a full body and rich aroma.

Cup Characteristics

Good body, high acidity, excellent aroma, intense flavor, chocolate notes



Middle East & Far East

Indonesian Sumatra Mandheling   
Heavy-bodied and syrupy especially when dark roasted.
Sumatra is the second largest island of the Republic of Indonesia. Sumatra Mandheling coffee although relatively rare is grown on the lofty volcanic slopes of Mount Leuser near the port of Padang in the Batak region of west-central Sumatra, at altitudes of 2,500 to 5,000 feet.

Coffee trees were originally brought to Indonesia in the early 19th century by the Dutch who sought to break the world-wide Arabic monopoly on the cultivation of coffee.  Within a few years, Indonesian coffee dominated the world's coffee market. Yet by the end of the century disease completely destroyed the crop. Coffee trees were successfully replanted and quickly gained a large share of the world market until the plantations were ravaged again during World War II.

The natural drying method used in its production results in a very full body with a concentrated flavor, garnished with herbal nuances and a spicy finish. The coffee has a low acidity and a richness that lingers on the back corners on your tongue. Notes of chocolate are evident in the finish.

Our main suppliers of FTO Sumatra, KSU Adil Wiladah Mabrur and Koperasi Gayo Mandiri, have used Fair Trade premiums to purchase agricultural tools (weed cutters, machetes, shovels and saws), and invest in environmental education and training (erosion, soil conservation and disposal of waste). Programs focusing on women's empowerment are also prevalent, such as supporting women during their pregnancy by purchasing necessary medical tools. They have also made an effort to hire women to do manufacturing work in processing facilities as well as training in financial management.

Cupping Notes

Strong cedar notes, consistent, balanced, sweet tobacco, winey, spicy, chocolate



Indonesia Java Blue
Heavy-bodied with a rich untamed taste.
Because of its popularity, the word “Java” not only describes a region in Indonesia, but has become a synonym for coffee. Java has been well-known in the world market since the early 17th century. The Arabica coffee tree was successfully introduced to the fertile island of Java in 1699. By 1711, coffee was being exported to Amsterdam by VOC, a Dutch East Indies Company.

In 1878, the coffee leaf rust disease was first found in Java. The destruction of Arabica coffee due to this disease occurred mostly with coffee at lower altitudes, due to its high susceptibility and climate. The Dutch coffee planters then began planting coffee at higher altitudes in order to minimize risk. In East Java, the new coffee was planted in fertile volcanic soil and in the dry climate of the Ijen Plateau areas, at altitudes ranging from 900 to 1,600 meters.

Since the 1960’s, Manduranese and Javanese farmers that inhabit the areas surrounding the plateau have grown Arabica coffee on their land. In addition, plantations have grown coffee near the villages of Kayumas and Curah Tatal, close to the Kayumas coffee estate. Smallholding Arabica coffee farms in this region are estimated to account for 1,500 – 3,000 total hectares.

Planting management applications by smallholding farmers near the villages of Kayumas and Curah Tatal are similar to the Arabica plantations of Kayumas. The manure they use is produced organically by the animals inside the farm (cattle, goats, and poultry); pesticides are never used.

The population of coffee ranges from 1,111 to 2,000 trees per hectare. The farmers generally prune their coffee trees using a single stem system. They cut their trees at 180cm in height in order to ease harvesting. In this system, cherry quality depends on branch management; better pruning yields higher quantities of high quality cherries.

Farmers use permanent shade trees such as Erythrina, Albizia, and Leucaena on their farms. Shading intensity generally ranges from 30% to over 50%. The trees are also a source of food for the animals. Arabica coffee is the most competitive cash crop for the farmers. In order to minimize risk, several farmers use intercropping with other perennial crops, such as Parkia (a kind of vegetable bean) and Avocados.

This coffee is produced on farms completely surrounded by the jungle, a place full of singing birds where one can find monkeys, the Civet cat, Orchid trees, and wild honey. The inhabitants of this region find their identity in the jungle, so the coffee farmers do everything they can to protect it.

Cup Characteristics

earthy notes, woody notes, floral, tobacco, hints of chocolate and caramel, creamy body, bright acidity, good balance



Papua New Guinea A Mile High

AfricaPNG coffees are revered for their interesting acidity and high variety. Notable for the mountainous topography of the island and the incredible cultural diversity of thousands of indiginous groups, historical changes in infrastructure have reduced the number of centralized coffee plantations typical of most coffee regions. Thus, many New Guinea plantations are actually collections of traditional “coffee gardens,” small plots of as little as 20 plants grown alongside subsistence crops. With increased introduction of modern processing methods, these already incredible coffees continue to grow in quality and consistency.

Mile High is the A grade offering from the Arokara Co-op. It is grown in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea on the outskirts of the town of Kainantu at an altitude of 1 mile above sea level.

Arokara is a co-operative of Plantations (Largest being Tairora and Gadsup) in the surrounding valley. The plantations are surrounded by mountains, two of the closest ones are Yonki Dome(7500 feet) and Elendora(9200 feet). With over 20 years experience in coffee growing and processing in PNG, Arokara has always delivered a quality bean. These plantations were originally set up by the Rural Development Bank with modern farming methods. In the last 10-15 years the plantations have been returned to the ownership and management of the landowner clans who now do not use any chemicals or fertilizers in the production process.

The cherry is hand picked by the whole clan and then pulped on the same day and fermented in cement vats for 36 hours. After the fermentation process the coffee is washed with fresh mountain stream water from the nearby Aru River. The coffee is then sun dried to give it a nice even bluish color, which can take 7-12 days.

The labor in the processing operation is also from the surrounding villages and ranges through the year from 20 up to 60 people in the peak season (this does not include the clan cherry pickers). The total community in the area who rely on the coffee exports is around 10000 to 12000 people.

Cup Characteristics

smooth body, berry, clean, consistent, pleasant aftertaste, cedar, malt and tea-like notes


Tanzanian Peaberry Zanzibar

Tanzania Peaberry Zanzibar is a premium blend from high grown estates in Southern Tanzania (Lunji, Utengule, and Kanji Lanji Estates) and Northern Tanzania (Mondul, Burka, Ngila, and Lyamungu Estates).

Southern Estates

The Southern Estates are located in Mbozi and Mbeya, in the southern highlands of Tanzania. Although total production is usually less than 500 metric tons, the coffee from Utengule, Lunji and Kanji Lalji estates has a very good reputation. The Utengule coffee estate is a traditional, well-managed East African Coffee farm that produces an exquisite Arabica coffee. There is a large variety of rare trees and flowers growing on the farm as well as several rivers. By walking through the 500 acre coffee estate you can explore how coffee is being grown, harvested, and processed.

Mondul Estate

This farm was developed by Count Vottorio Davico di Quittengo in 1931 after a careful inspection of the fertile and uninhabited areas on the slopes of the Mondul mountains in Northern Tanganyika. He fell in love with East Africa after working briefly for the Central Africa Exploration Company in Uganda. After convincing his family in Italy to assist him in the purchase of the land, the Mondul Coffee Estate was founded. Count Davico died in 1983 and was buried at Mondul on the highest hill overlooking the estate. His two sons are now running the estate with the same entrepreneurial spirit and social commitment of their father. It has a total production of 1400kg/ha.

Burka Estate

This farm was established in 1899 by German settlers and has continued as a coffee producing farm. The estate covers an area of 1500 acres with an annual production of 1000 metric tons. The estate is also home to the Arusha Coffee Lodge, which has coffee plantation tours, horseback riding, mountain biking, and nature trails.

Ngila Estate

This estate is situated in the Karatu District on the slopes of the Ngorongoro crater and is surrounded by the Ngila Forest reserve. It was founded in the 20th century by a German family and later taken over by British farmers after the WWII, who sold it to Ruldolf Meyer in 1990.

Lyamungu Estate

Lyamungu is located on the southern foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, approximately 15km from the Moshi/Arusha main highway. It was established in 1934 as a center for coffee research in Tanzania and is now leased to Mufindi Tea Company.

Cup Characteristics

black tea notes, chocolate notes, blackberry notes, kiwi notes, lemony acidity, sweet, balanced, complex


Ethiopian Washed Yiragacheffe Gr.2
Rich, wild, fruity and exotic.

The coffees of Yirgacheffe have long been prized for their delicate, tea-like aromatics and clean citrus flavor. We offer you an excellent example from a producer committed to both quality and equity.

OCFCU

Many of our certified Ethiopian offerings come from Oromia Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (OCFCU), a small-farmers owned cooperative union which has members from all coffee growing areas in Oromia regional state. Established in 1999 to facilitate the direct export of coffee produced by small farmers cooperatives, OCFCU works exclusively in Oromia Regional State, which accounts for 65 percent of the country’s total coffee growing land. Oromia, along with their General Manager, Tadesse Meskela, have been internationally recognized for their implementation of farmer support programs. OCFCU has an excellent reputation for supporting its members and their communities. The Union pays 70% of its net profit back to the cooperatives, who in turn pay 70% of their profit to the member farmers. Farmers benefit by being paid three times in one season, allowing for greater stability. This strategy of support has enabled OCFCU to grow from 34 primary cooperatives representing 22,691 household farmers to 217 primary cooperatives representing 200,000 household farmers. OCFCU maintains a members bank to provide much needed pre-harvest financing, a major impediment for Ethiopian farmers. They also provide their farmers with insurance options to cover coffee against loss.

Along with focusing on farmer equity, Oromia has recently opened a new cupping lab to continue their commitment to quality control. The processing facility has a volume of nearly 5-7 tonnes of coffee per day, creating jobs for 600 – 900 temporary employees.

Cupping Notes: medium acidity, light lemon-lime, floral, soft, tea like, medium body

Ethiopian Washed Sidamo Gr. 2

Another of the classic Ethiopian coffee regions, Sidamo coffees are known for medium body, delicate fruits, spice, and citrus. Our FTO Washed Sidamo fits the bill.

OCFCU

Many of our certified Ethiopian offerings come from Oromia Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (OCFCU), a small-farmers owned cooperative union which has members from all coffee growing areas in Oromia regional state. Established in 1999 to facilitate the direct export of coffee produced by small farmers cooperatives, OCFCU works exclusively in Oromia Regional State, which accounts for 65 percent of the country’s total coffee growing land. Oromia, along with their General Manager, Tadesse Meskela (pictured), have been internationally recognized for their implementation of farmer support programs.

OCFCU has an excellent reputation for supporting its members and their communities. The Union pays 70% of its net profit back to the cooperatives, who in turn pay 70% of their profit to the member farmers. Farmers benefit by being paid three times in one season, allowing for greater stability. This strategy of support has enabled OCFCU to grow from 34 primary cooperatives representing 22,691 household farmers to 217 primary cooperatives representing 200,000 household farmers. OCFCU maintains a members bank to provide much needed pre-harvest financing, a major impediment for Ethiopian farmers. They also provide their farmers with insurance options to cover coffee against loss.

Along with focusing on farmer equity, Oromia has recently opened a new cupping lab to continue their commitment to quality control. The processing facility has a volume of nearly 5-7 tonnes of coffee per day, creating jobs for 600 – 900 temporary employees.

Cupping Notes

Berry, winey, clear lemon and rock candy sweetness. Complex acidity. Long, lush aftertaste.

Ethiopian Harrar 

The Harrar region lies in the Eastern Highlands of Ethiopia. As one of the main growing regions in the original coffee country, Harrar has a reputation for producing distinctive wild-varietal Arabica as it has for centuries: dry-processed, sun-dried, and hand sorted by thousands of knowledgeable workers.

OCFCU

Many of our certified Ethiopian offerings come from Oromia Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (OCFCU), a small-farmers owned cooperative union which has members from all coffee growing areas in Oromia regional state. Established in 1999 to facilitate the direct export of coffee produced by small farmers cooperatives, OCFCU works exclusively in Oromia Regional State, which accounts for 65 percent of the country’s total coffee growing land. Oromia, along with their General Manager, Tadesse Meskela (pictured below), have been internationally recognized for their implementation of farmer support programs.

OCFCU has an excellent reputation for supporting its members and their communities. The Union pays 70% of its net profit back to the cooperatives, who in turn pay 70% of their profit to the member farmers. Farmers benefit by being paid three times in one season, allowing for greater stability. This strategy of support has enabled OCFCU to grow from 34 primary cooperatives representing 22,691 household farmers to 217 primary cooperatives representing 200,000 household farmers. OCFCU maintains a members bank to provide much needed pre-harvest financing, a major impediment for Ethiopian farmers. They also provide their

Cup Characteristics

good fruity complexity, full body, creamy, dried fruit, spice, berry


 
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